CPS1 Regional Differences

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CPS1 Regional Differences

Post by jepjepjep » February 15th, 2013, 10:20 pm

I'm not aware of any place that has a list of the regional differences on CPS1 games. I was talking with Merlin and we thought it would be good to start a reference thread where we could list all of the changes since some of them are pretty drastic. Please post any differences you know about and any mistakes that you may see.

Forgotten Worlds/Lost Worlds:
Title Screen
In addition to the logo change, the Capcom copyright info uses a unique font in the Japanese version. The international versions also add the highest score to the top of the screen.

Starting Satellite
In all other versions of the game but the U.S. one, the player starts off with the V-Cannon satellite. In the U.S. game, the player starts with no satellite at all, making the start of the game more difficult.

Item Shop
In Lost Worlds, Sylphie bows to the player(s) when they enter the shop. She also blinks occasionally. In Forgotten Worlds, Sylphie isn't animated at all. She just stares with cold, unblinking eyes. She also has some voice clips in Lost World. Apparently the localization team couldn't get a female voice actress. Finally, there are noises for purchasing and failing to purchase an item in the Japanese game.

Dress Item
The final shop's inventory is different between versions. While Forgotten Worlds has a Unit Stone, Lost Worlds has a unique item: The Dress / Clothes. It costs 99900 Zennys, tied with the Homing Laser for most expensive item in the game. Its only purpose is to give the player an extra 1,000,000 points at the end of the game. The item description + purchase text are probably why it was removed. They weren't translated at all in Forgotten Worlds, though the untranslated item name "FUKU" remains in memory at 109D0.

source: TCRF http://tcrf.net/Forgotten_Worlds_(Arcad ... ifferences

Ghouls'n Ghosts/Daimakaimura:
The difficulty is very different among regions. The US version is by far the easiest. It has many more checkpoints, enemies are less aggressive and bosses take fewer hits. World and Japan versions have the same checkpoints but enemies are more aggressive in the Japan version and there are fewer enemies in the World version.
Strider/Strider Hiryu:
Japan version has an additional sound effect when he swings the sword.
Dynasty Wars/Tenchi wo Kurau:

Willow:

UN Squadron/Area 88:
Area 88 has a bonus stage where you shoot the bombs off of a passenger plane that was cut from UN Squadron.
Final Fight:
The Japan version has an extra intro screne that shows Jessica in her bra.

The Japanese version states the exact year when the game takes place: 1989, which happens to be the same year the game was made. The American version changed this to a vague "sometime in the 1990's..." instead. The date Final Fight takes place was later retconned to 1987.

The special credits sequence has brief comments from the development staff in the Japanese version. These were not translated for the American version, instead, the text just states the staff's nicknames. The layout for the mugshots was also altered. Messages from the game's development staff are only in the Japanese version.
source: http://rq87.flyingomelette.com/FF/F/1/reg.html"
1941 Counter Attack:
Stages 1 and 2 were switched in the US version. There are two World versions, one with each stage order.

In the Export releases, at the 5th position on the high score table, it says 'o02' instead of 'j01' in the original Japanese release.
Source: http://www.arcade-history.com/?n=1941-c ... l&id=69748"
Mercs/Senjou no Ookami II:

Mega Twins/Chiki Chiki Boys:
The bikini girls you can rescue in Chiki Chiki Boys were cut from Mega Twins. Also the jump mechanic was changed. In Chiki Chiki Boys the normal jump is shorter and you can push UP+jump to do a high jump. In Mega Twins it is always only the high jump.
Magic Sword:
When a "screen crash" spell is used, an image flashes on-screen for a few frames. In the Japanese and World 900623 revisions, it's a hexagram: the symbols inside the hexagram are the astrological symbols for Saturn, Mercury, Venus, the Sun, Mars, and possibly Jupiter; the symbols on the outer circle are unknown and possibly made up. The other two revisions (USA and World 900725) use a lightning bolt, which is arguably more effective.

source: TCRF http://tcrf.net/Magic_Sword_(Arcade)
Carrier Air Wing/US Navy:
Sean Connery's portrait was changed in CAW.
The development staff are listed in the end credits of U.S. Navy but not in Carrier Air Wing.
Nemo:

Street Fighter II The World Warrior:
In the Japanese versions :
* Balrog is named 'M. Bison' (in this case, the M stands for 'Mike').
* Vega is named 'Balrog'.
* M. Bison is named 'Vega'.
* Guile's deceased friend Charlie is named 'Nash'.
* Guile's wife Jane is named 'Julia'.
* Guile's daughter Amy is named 'Chris', however there is no mention of her name anywhere in Guile's Japanese ending.

None of the endings are translated 100% accurately from Japanese to English, but most are pretty close :
* Blanka's ending : In the non-Japanese versions, Blanka's mother says that he was lost when his plane crashed in Brazil when he was a baby. In the Japanese versions there is no explanation of how, when, or where mother and son were separated. Since the anklets she gave to Jimmy BEFORE they were separated still fit him, he was probably not supposed to be a baby when he was lost.
* Chun Li's ending : Chun Li refers to M. Bison's organization as 'Bison's drug'. This was probably supposed to be 'drug ring', as the word 'ring' was added in later versions of the game. In the Japanese versions, she calls it 'the organization of evil'; there is no mention of drugs.
* Dhalsim's ending : In the Japanese versions, Dhalsim says that the photograph is of him a long time ago. In the non-Japanese versions, he says it is him 'in his past life'. Since only three years had passed, he obviously didn't actually mean that he had died and been reincarnated since the photograph had been taken.
* Guile's ending : In the non-Japanese versions, Guile asks M. Bison if he remembers : him (Guile), him and Charlie and Cambodia. Bison says he remembers and that Guile was not the runt he was then. None of this is said in the Japanese versions. In the non-Japanese versions, after his wife Jane stops Guile from killing Bison, she says that killing him won't bring Charlie back, only make Guile a murderer, just like Bison. In the Japanese versions, 'Julia' only says that killing 'Vega' won't bring 'Nash' back. She does not say that it would make Guile a murderer.

Source: http://www.arcade-history.com/?n=street ... il&id=2657
Three Wonders/Wonder 3:
The platformer (Roosters/Midnight Wanderers) and shooter (Chariot) are more difficult in the Japan version.
The King of Dragons:
Several features found only in the Japanese arcade version: A green lizard spearman and dark red lizard swordsman, a gold gauntlet treasure worth 800 EXP, a standing triple fireball attack for the Green Dragon, an attack for the Hydra where any of the heads jerk backwards and spit a fast glob at a sharp angle, not all fruit restores 16 health, the order you get upgrades is reversed (armor followed by weaponry), the characters gain max HP at different levels, and a different sound effect is used when a character gains a level, enters a stage or is revived. (from a FAQ on Gamefaqs)

Gildiss has a slightly different attack pattern in the JPN version compared to the World version. Each time he changes position he chases you with fiery breath which needs to be blocked or avoided. The slight changes in boss attack patterns and the fruit health gain differences do make the World version a bit easier but I'd say it's not that much of a difference. In the US and JPN version there are rocks falling down during the battle with Gildiss. (from Merlin)
Captain Commando:
The character names are different:
Sho is renamed Ginzu
Jennety is renamed Mack the Knife
Hoover is renamed Baby Head
Genocide is renamed Scumocide
Knights of the Round:

Street Fighter II' Champion Edition:

Varth:
The Japan region has checkpoints while the World and US versions have insant respawn.
Quiz and Dragons:
This Japanese re-release hosts some major changes and improvements:
* Now you can roll the dice by yourself - No automatic roll.
* Characters start with only 3 points of life.
* Characters gain experience points and level up, increasing their maximum life points and gaining items.
* A Name Entry screen before you begin.
* You can now choose to use or keep the items for later quiz battles.
* Graphics and design changed to have the more Capcom-fighter hand-drawn look.
* Different musics.
* Different Capcom logo screen.
* Story changes.
* Much more animation added.
* Monster placement on the playfields is different.
* The questions are more Anime, Manga and Game-oriented.
(from 'arcade history')
Warriors of Fate/Tenchi wo Kurau II: Sekiheki no Tatakai:
There are quite a few things that were changed or taken out between the original Japanese version (Tenchi wo Kurau II) and Warrior of Fates. They are listed as follows :
* After the bonus stage, a scene with the 3rd emperor making comments was cut.
* After the bonus stage, there was an additional conversation with the advisor and Kuan-Ti.
* All names in-game were accompanied by their kanji.
* All names were changed and aren't even properly translated from the originals.
* Before the bonus stage, there is a scene where Kuan-Ti is discussing with the 3rd emperor is cut.
* In stage 1, a short message from the advisor was taken out.
* In stage 1, the boss gave a short dialogue.
* In stage 3, during the opening the boss has a short dialogue.
* In stage 4, the boss had a short dialogue.
* In stage 5, Akkila-Orkhan has a short dialogue.
* In stage 5, the boss had a short dialogue.
* In stage 5, after killing the boss there is a long scene dealing with a woman and a baby that was completely cut.
* In stage 6, there were additional lines between the player and Kuan-Ti.
* In stage 8, a short message from the advisor was taken out.
* In stage 8, the boss has a short dialogue.
* In stage 9, a short message from the advisor was taken out.
* In stage 9, there was a conversation between player and the boss.
* In stage 9, you can select from 2 decisions which could determine which of 3 endings you would get.
* Some weapons were generalized in the World version.
* The demo opening and text is different giving more detail from the events that occurred in Tenchi o Kurau 1.
* The text 'Tekishou (boss name) uchiitotarii' was accompanied with the voice at the end of every stage (The enemy commander (boss name) has been killed!).

source: arcade-history.com http://www.arcade-history.com/?n=warrio ... il&id=3146
The Japanese version also has three more weapons.

source: Hardcore Gaming 101

http://hardcoregaming101.net/finalfight ... clones.htm
Street Fighter II' Hyper Fighting:

The Punisher:
Both playable characters have a flame kick move that can only be done in the Japanese version. To do it, you need to be rolling, then press the jump button, hold down and press the attack button.

In the Japanese version, Punisher and Nick's special kick moves (down, up+attack button) will cause enemies to be set on fire with blue flames. In the American version these moves cause a squirt of blood from an enemy hit by them.

The intros for each version are slightly different, the images of Punisher's family being murdered are shown on screen a lot longer than in the Japanese version. There's some different English text in the Japanese version too. Right at the start of the Japanese version intro, the Punisher skull logo appears with a red and green flashing background.

The Japanese version ending has a red picture of a criminal being removed from rubble. There is another blue picture exclusive to the Japanese version featuring a criminal who I guess is out of work since the Kingpin organization has collapsed. These things are not in the American version.

The names of the stages are different depending on the version.

Several of the character voices have higher pitches in the Japanese version, compared to the U.S. one.

In the American version, when the final stage is completed the Punisher will say "I did it" and Nick will say "Alright" as the scores total up. Neither of these voice clips are heard in the Japanese version.
source: http://rq87.flyingomelette.com/RQ/R/ARC/PUN/1.html"
Cadillacs and Dinosaurs/Cadillacs: Kyouryuu Shin Seiki:
During the storyline on the original Japanese release, there is a scrolling effect on the text. All the Export versions have no such effect.

Most of the enemies have different names between versions. At the end of the second part of the first level, your character will say something, but this text is missing from the American version. Whenever your character says something, their portrait appears next to the text in the Japanese version. The portraits don't appear in the American version.

The font used for displaying which episode is starting is different in the Japanese version. In the ending sequence, Mess has a line in the Japanese version which is not present in the American version.

There are a few graphical differences in the intro sequence. Two scenes are not present in the Japanese version whilst another part only appears in the Japanese version.

The music played at the character bio screens in the U.S./European versions is different from the Japanese version.

Source: http://www.arcade-history.com/?n=cadill ... ail&id=369"
Source: http://rq87.flyingomelette.com/RQ/R/ARC/C&D/1.html"
Saturday Night Slam Masters/Muscle Bomber:
Most of the character names were changed. Titan is one of two characters to not get a different name. Haggar is the other. The measurements for height and weight are done differently depending on the version.

Source: http://rq87.flyingomelette.com/RQ/R/ARC/SNSM/1.html"
Muscle Bomber Duo:
All of the character name changes made to the original game apply here. For example, Astro became Scorp, and Kimala became Jumbo.

At the VS. screen, character's signatures can be seen. These signatures are different depending on the version. Even characters with the same names have different signatures, such as Ortega.

At the winner/loser screen, every losing character has some Kanji next to their portrait in the Japanese version, this was removed from the European version. Also, in the Japanese version, the winner will say something in Japanese, but again this was removed from the Euro version.

The Japanese version had bios for every character that would display in attract mode. These were taken out of the European version and instead replaced with a "how to play the game" sequence.

Source: http://rq87.flyingomelette.com/RQ/R/ARC/ROD/1.html"
Pang 3:

Mega Man/Rockman: The Power Battle:
The Japanese version has a bit of animation on the title screen (the gears in behind the logo) that doesn't appear in other versions. The Japanese game has a unique background for the Score Ranking screen. Other versions recycle the Wily Castle map background. The Japanese weapon acquired screen uses a different, unique background. The international versions use an animated gear background, based on the gears in the Japanese version's title screen. The biggest difference between versions is the inclusion of many more character voices in the Japanese game. All clips involving the player / bosses actually speaking were removed from non-Japanese variants.

Source: http://tcrf.net/Mega_Man:_The_Power_Bat ... ifferences
Last edited by jepjepjep on May 22nd, 2013, 11:27 pm, edited 9 times in total.

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Re: CPS1 Regional Differences

Post by geotrig » February 15th, 2013, 11:10 pm

good idea for a thread
Final Fight on the Japanese version defaults (1 extra life awarded. USA defaults give you 5 extra ) from the thread directly below

I think cadillacs and dinosaurs is similar with a hard difficulty ..i not certain though
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Re: CPS1 Regional Differences

Post by Merlin » February 15th, 2013, 11:46 pm

Thanks for creating this thread jepjepjep. Will be good to have a definitive list.

Here are a few more:

Forgotten Worlds/Lost Worlds:
Title Screen
In addition to the logo change, the Capcom copyright info uses a unique font in the Japanese version. The international versions also add the highest score to the top of the screen.

Starting Satellite
In all other versions of the game but the U.S. one, the player starts off with the V-Cannon satellite. In the U.S. game, the player starts with no satellite at all, making the start of the game more difficult.

Item Shop
In Lost Worlds, Sylphie bows to the player(s) when they enter the shop. She also blinks occasionally. In Forgotten Worlds, Sylphie isn't animated at all. She just stares with cold, unblinking eyes. She also has some voice clips in Lost World. Apparently the localization team couldn't get a female voice actress. Finally, there are noises for purchasing and failing to purchase an item in the Japanese game.

Dress Item
The final shop's inventory is different between versions. While Forgotten Worlds has a Unit Stone, Lost Worlds has a unique item: The Dress / Clothes. It costs 99900 Zennys, tied with the Homing Laser for most expensive item in the game. Its only purpose is to give the player an extra 1,000,000 points at the end of the game. The item description + purchase text are probably why it was removed. They weren't translated at all in Forgotten Worlds, though the untranslated item name "FUKU" remains in memory at 109D0.
source: TCRF

http://tcrf.net/Forgotten_Worlds_(Arcad ... ifferences

Magic Sword:
When a "screen crash" spell is used, an image flashes on-screen for a few frames. In the Japanese and World 900623 revisions, it's a hexagram: the symbols inside the hexagram are the astrological symbols for Saturn, Mercury, Venus, the Sun, Mars, and possibly Jupiter; the symbols on the outer circle are unknown and possibly made up. The other two revisions (USA and World 900725) use a lightning bolt, which is arguably more effective.
source: TCRF

http://tcrf.net/Magic_Sword_(Arcade)

Warriors of Fate/Tenchi wo Kurau II: Sekiheki no Tatakai:
There are quite a few things that were changed or taken out between the original Japanese version (Tenchi wo Kurau II) and Warrior of Fates. They are listed as follows :
* After the bonus stage, a scene with the 3rd emperor making comments was cut.
* After the bonus stage, there was an additional conversation with the advisor and Kuan-Ti.
* All names in-game were accompanied by their kanji.
* All names were changed and aren't even properly translated from the originals.
* Before the bonus stage, there is a scene where Kuan-Ti is discussing with the 3rd emperor is cut.
* In stage 1, a short message from the advisor was taken out.
* In stage 1, the boss gave a short dialogue.
* In stage 3, during the opening the boss has a short dialogue.
* In stage 4, the boss had a short dialogue.
* In stage 5, Akkila-Orkhan has a short dialogue.
* In stage 5, the boss had a short dialogue.
* In stage 5, after killing the boss there is a long scene dealing with a woman and a baby that was completely cut.
* In stage 6, there were additional lines between the player and Kuan-Ti.
* In stage 8, a short message from the advisor was taken out.
* In stage 8, the boss has a short dialogue.
* In stage 9, a short message from the advisor was taken out.
* In stage 9, there was a conversation between player and the boss.
* In stage 9, you can select from 2 decisions which could determine which of 3 endings you would get.
* Some weapons were generalized in the World version.
* The demo opening and text is different giving more detail from the events that occurred in Tenchi o Kurau 1.
* The text 'Tekishou (boss name) uchiitotarii' was accompanied with the voice at the end of every stage (The enemy commander (boss name) has been killed!).
source: arcade-history.com

http://www.arcade-history.com/?n=warrio ... il&id=3146
The Japanese version also has three more weapons.
source: Hardcore Gaming 101

http://hardcoregaming101.net/finalfight ... clones.htm
Last edited by Merlin on February 15th, 2013, 11:56 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: CPS1 Regional Differences

Post by jepjepjep » February 15th, 2013, 11:55 pm

geotrig wrote: Final Fight on the Japanese version defaults (1 extra life awarded. USA defaults give you 5 extra ) from the thread directly below
I think this might be a case of MAME defaulting to the wrong dip switch settings. The US version has the same dip switches as the Japan version but the US manual doesn't specify factory settings (US Manual: http://www.gamesdbase.com/Media/SYSTEM/ ... Capcom.pdf") (Japan manual: http://tamdb.net/index.php?page=ManualD ... 6e&id=1342").

I'd like to know if the dip switches are set to the same (Japan defaults) is the in-game difficulty the same?

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Re: CPS1 Regional Differences

Post by Ex_Mosquito » February 16th, 2013, 8:17 am

jepjepjep wrote:
geotrig wrote: Final Fight on the Japanese version defaults (1 extra life awarded. USA defaults give you 5 extra ) from the thread directly below
I think this might be a case of MAME defaulting to the wrong dip switch settings. The US version has the same dip switches as the Japan version but the US manual doesn't specify factory settings (US Manual: http://www.gamesdbase.com/Media/SYSTEM/ ... Capcom.pdf") (Japan manual: http://tamdb.net/index.php?page=ManualD ... 6e&id=1342").

I'd like to know if the dip switches are set to the same (Japan defaults) is the in-game difficulty the same?
Hmm that's strange. Whenever I used to see a final fight cab in the arcades back in the 90's they were ALWAYS set to an extra life for 100.000pts and every 200.000pts. Even the Xbox 360 live arcade version defaults to it. But when I was in Tokyo in 09' every cab I saw (about 5) all had only 1 extra life set to 100.000pts. Maybe it was an honor thing? ;)
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Re: CPS1 Regional Differences

Post by jpj » February 16th, 2013, 9:09 pm


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Re: CPS1 Regional Differences

Post by idc » February 17th, 2013, 12:50 pm

jepjepjep wrote: Ghouls'n Ghosts/Daimakaimura:
The difficulty is very different among regions. The US version is by far the easiest. It has many more checkpoints, enemies are less aggressive and bosses take fewer hits. World and Japan versions have the same checkpoints but enemies are more aggressive in the Japan version.
Pretty certain that the European version is gimped because it seems to be missing a bunch of enemies.
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Re: CPS1 Regional Differences

Post by Merlin » February 17th, 2013, 5:33 pm

jepjepjep wrote: Three Wonders/Wonder 3:
The platformer (Roosters/Midnight Wanderers) and shooter (Chariot) are more difficult in the Japan version.
What are the differences in the difficulty of JPN Chariot? I've mainly played the World version on Mame.



Mega Man/Rockman: The Power Battle:
The Japanese version has a bit of animation on the title screen (the gears in behind the logo) that doesn't appear in other versions. The Japanese game has a unique background for the Score Ranking screen. Other versions recycle the Wily Castle map background. The Japanese weapon acquired screen uses a different, unique background. The international versions use an animated gear background, based on the gears in the Japanese version's title screen. The biggest difference between versions is the inclusion of many more character voices in the Japanese game. All clips involving the player / bosses actually speaking were removed from non-Japanese variants.
http://tcrf.net/Mega_Man:_The_Power_Bat ... ifferences

Street Fighter II The World Warrior:
In the Japanese versions :
* Balrog is named 'M. Bison' (in this case, the M stands for 'Mike').
* Vega is named 'Balrog'.
* M. Bison is named 'Vega'.
* Guile's deceased friend Charlie is named 'Nash'.
* Guile's wife Jane is named 'Julia'.
* Guile's daughter Amy is named 'Chris', however there is no mention of her name anywhere in Guile's Japanese ending.

None of the endings are translated 100% accurately from Japanese to English, but most are pretty close :
* Blanka's ending : In the non-Japanese versions, Blanka's mother says that he was lost when his plane crashed in Brazil when he was a baby. In the Japanese versions there is no explanation of how, when, or where mother and son were separated. Since the anklets she gave to Jimmy BEFORE they were separated still fit him, he was probably not supposed to be a baby when he was lost.
* Chun Li's ending : Chun Li refers to M. Bison's organization as 'Bison's drug'. This was probably supposed to be 'drug ring', as the word 'ring' was added in later versions of the game. In the Japanese versions, she calls it 'the organization of evil'; there is no mention of drugs.
* Dhalsim's ending : In the Japanese versions, Dhalsim says that the photograph is of him a long time ago. In the non-Japanese versions, he says it is him 'in his past life'. Since only three years had passed, he obviously didn't actually mean that he had died and been reincarnated since the photograph had been taken.
* Guile's ending : In the non-Japanese versions, Guile asks M. Bison if he remembers : him (Guile), him and Charlie and Cambodia. Bison says he remembers and that Guile was not the runt he was then. None of this is said in the Japanese versions. In the non-Japanese versions, after his wife Jane stops Guile from killing Bison, she says that killing him won't bring Charlie back, only make Guile a murderer, just like Bison. In the Japanese versions, 'Julia' only says that killing 'Vega' won't bring 'Nash' back. She does not say that it would make Guile a murderer.
http://www.arcade-history.com/?n=street ... il&id=2657

There's also a very small difference in the 1941 Counter Attack high score tables and also character name changes in Captain Commando.

http://www.arcade-history.com/?n=1941-c ... l&id=69748

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Re: CPS1 Regional Differences

Post by jepjepjep » February 17th, 2013, 8:24 pm

jpj wrote:
[+] Spoiler...
Nice find, I'll add a list of the changes. I may have to go play the JPN version now :awe: .
idc wrote: Pretty certain that the European version is gimped because it seems to be missing a bunch of enemies.
I was kind of nebulous in the description about Japanese enemies being more aggressive than World/European. I haven't spent a ton of time with the World version but I've always thought they move faster and respawn more quickly. Didn't realize that there were some missing. Is it a case of fewer onscreen at the same time or are there certain enemies that were cut?
Merlin wrote: What are the differences in the difficulty of JPN Chariot? I've mainly played the World version on Mame.
I haven't spent an extensive time with Chariot, but I noticed right away that the enemy bullets are much faster in the JPN version (see the first stage midboss). The same is true of the platformer, the tree boss in the first stage has faster projectiles in Roosters (even faster than Midnight Wanderers on max difficulty).

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Re: CPS1 Regional Differences

Post by Merlin » February 18th, 2013, 4:10 am

jepjepjep wrote: I haven't spent an extensive time with Chariot, but I noticed right away that the enemy bullets are much faster in the JPN version (see the first stage midboss). The same is true of the platformer, the tree boss in the first stage has faster projectiles in Roosters (even faster than Midnight Wanderers on max difficulty).
Thanks for the info. I noticed differences in Roosters but didn't know about the faster shot speed in the Japanese version of Chariot.

The Punisher:
Both playable characters have a flame kick move that can only be done in the Japanese version. To do it, you need to be rolling, then press the jump button, hold down and press the attack button.

In the Japanese version, Punisher and Nick's special kick moves (down, up+attack button) will cause enemies to be set on fire with blue flames. In the American version these moves cause a squirt of blood from an enemy hit by them.

The intros for each version are slightly different, the images of Punisher's family being murdered are shown on screen a lot longer than in the Japanese version. There's some different English text in the Japanese version too. Right at the start of the Japanese version intro, the Punisher skull logo appears with a red and green flashing background.

The Japanese version ending has a red picture of a criminal being removed from rubble. There is another blue picture exclusive to the Japanese version featuring a criminal who I guess is out of work since the Kingpin organization has collapsed. These things are not in the American version.

The names of the stages are different depending on the version.

Several of the character voices have higher pitches in the Japanese version, compared to the U.S. one.

In the American version, when the final stage is completed the Punisher will say "I did it" and Nick will say "Alright" as the scores total up. Neither of these voice clips are heard in the Japanese version.
http://rq87.flyingomelette.com/RQ/R/ARC/PUN/1.html


Cadillacs and Dinosaurs/Cadillacs: Kyouryuu Shin Seiki:
During the storyline on the original Japanese release, there is a scrolling effect on the text. All the Export versions have no such effect.

Most of the enemies have different names between versions. At the end of the second part of the first level, your character will say something, but this text is missing from the American version. Whenever your character says something, their portrait appears next to the text in the Japanese version. The portraits don't appear in the American version.

The font used for displaying which episode is starting is different in the Japanese version. In the ending sequence, Mess has a line in the Japanese version which is not present in the American version.

There are a few graphical differences in the intro sequence. Two scenes are not present in the Japanese version whilst another part only appears in the Japanese version.

The music played at the character bio screens in the U.S./European versions is different from the Japanese version.
http://www.arcade-history.com/?n=cadill ... ail&id=369

http://rq87.flyingomelette.com/RQ/R/ARC/C&D/1.html

Final Fight:
The Japanese version states the exact year when the game takes place: 1989, which happens to be the same year the game was made. The American version changed this to a vague "sometime in the 1990's..." instead. The date Final Fight takes place was later retconned to 1987.

The special credits sequence has brief comments from the development staff in the Japanese version. These were not translated for the American version, instead, the text just states the staff's nicknames. The layout for the mugshots was also altered. Messages from the game's development staff are only in the Japanese version.
http://rq87.flyingomelette.com/FF/F/1/reg.html

Saturday Night Slam Masters/Muscle Bomber:
Most of the character names were changed. Titan is one of two characters to not get a different name. Haggar is the other. The measurements for height and weight are done differently depending on the version.
http://rq87.flyingomelette.com/RQ/R/ARC/SNSM/1.html"

Muscle Bomber Duo:
All of the character name changes made to the original game apply here. For example, Astro became Scorp, and Kimala became Jumbo.

At the VS. screen, character's signatures can be seen. These signatures are different depending on the version. Even characters with the same names have different signatures, such as Ortega.

At the winner/loser screen, every losing character has some Kanji next to their portrait in the Japanese version, this was removed from the European version. Also, in the Japanese version, the winner will say something in Japanese, but again this was removed from the Euro version.

The Japanese version had bios for every character that would display in attract mode. These were taken out of the European version and instead replaced with a "how to play the game" sequence.
http://rq87.flyingomelette.com/RQ/R/ARC/ROD/1.html


The boss Scumocide in Captain Commando is called Genocide in the Japanese version.

The development staff are listed in the end credits of U.S. Navy but not in Carrier Air Wing.

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